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Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
DJ's C-20 454

Hi all,

Long time no see. Some of you will know me from the Yahoo groups or have visited my website. Recently it started itching again and I bought a for Dutch standards very difficult to obtain vehicle. A '73 Chevy C-20 pickup truck with a 454 engine. I know, on your side of the pond such vehicles are shredded or left to rot.... But me and my wife are happy with with this simple, staight forward truck, although there always will be a Volvo around too.

I am in the midst of building the gasifier. Again full stainless. Many details from the Volvo gasifier are used again. The hearth is different, hopper and filter will be square, but following the contours of the cabin. No dry filtering this time. Dry filtering is superb, but do not want to have it destroyed by only one mistake. The truck will also be driven by a lesser experienced woodgasser.

Pics will follow as soon as possible.

Regards,
DJ

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Hello Dutch John and welcome.

Hello Dutch John and welcome.
There has been some interesting talk in different topic/project lines about the needed ignition advance for woodgas running these big engines.
Look forward to seeing some of your underhood pictures.

Regards
Steve Unruh

Mike LaRosa
Mike LaRosa's picture
DJ, Thanks for checking in

DJ, Thanks for checking in with the gang again .. That is definitely a "cash for clunkers" car here but you will be able to race Wayne when you get it done "young man" .. Please post occasionally on the yahoo stuff .. It's not the best forum but it is what it is and there are very few others .. Thanks, Mike LaRosa PS, wish I could remember your real name .. I wrote it down years ago ... Cyclone and a good hay filter should be enough for that engine .. They love soot and it keeps them from burning oil ... packs the rings up ..

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Let's see if I can upload a

OK, under the hood most is done. I made a distribution box on top of the intake manifold. Mixing tube and backfire lid on top. Right behind is the woodgas inlet, right in front the air inlet. Upstream (black painted) a manual choke and a vacuum controlled one. Air filter will come behind the headlight.

Left in front is the IMPCO LPG carb, now tilted 90 degrees. When driving on woodgas or petrol, the 3" ball valve is closed. Left back is a Stromberg petrol carb for emergency, starting help and boost. Ball valve is open when driving on woodgas. The petrol throttle is only manually operated. It gets air from the IMPCO air filter. It was the original GM filter housing, but most of it ended in the trash bin.

The gas pedal operates the IMPCO. When the ball valve is closed to drive on woodgas, the linkage between IMPCO and woodgas mixer is fixed by a pin. The linkage is a rod that can slide in a tube. The pin connects them. The throttle valves of the woodgas mixer have there own manual idle setting, because when driving on LPG, the throttles are not allowed to leak dilluting air.

This is about the same setup as used on the Volvo. The vacuum control allows an adjustmentfree driving. Except when the gas quality changes, it needs adjustment, while the vacuum control does the fine tuning.

Getting the gas pipe along the chassis, through the fender and around the steering column was rather a challenge. I never make 90 degree elbows by cutting a pipe under 45 degrees. I always take smooth 90 degree welding curves (right word?) For a lesser angle the curves are cut up. It takes one welding seem extra and a bit more money for the welding curves, but the reward is a lesser pressure drop and a good looking tube.

Regards,
DJ

Chris Franklin
Chris Franklin's picture
Nice work DJ. Now let's see

Nice work DJ. Now let's see some photos of the 90's you're describing. Keep up the good work.

Chris F.

Terry Grzyb
Terry Grzyb's picture
Pictures are worth a thousand

Pictures are worth a thousand words. Thank you DJ.
The vacuum diaphragm really interests me. I know Max suggests them on every system. I need to try to attach one to my Ranger.
Could you show a better picture of this linkage?
Thanks in advance,
Terry

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
This is the best I have. The

This is the best I have. The blue membrame is now changed for more elastic pond foil. Needs a bit heat to stretch. The controller is rather small, but worked well on the Volvo.

Valves are easy to make if you have (access to) a lathe. Take thick walled pipe and lathe the inside to the desired size. Take a rod and bring it to the same diameter. It should fit very tight in the pipe. Cut thin slices under 15 degrees from this rod for example with a band saw: your valve flaps. For bushing I used 12x1 mm coppeer water tube, an end cap and 10 mm rod as axle.
All cutting is done with a small angle grinder. I desperatly need a plasma cutter....

Regards,
DJ

Chris Saenz
Chris Saenz's picture
DJ, on the plasma - I got one

DJ, on the plasma - I got one for $300 and it's doing the job fine. So nice to cut with. Look on Ebay for Lotos 5000D (or similar).

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
No way back anymore: I cut

No way back anymore: I cut the bed. The actual hearth is mostly below the bed, because I want a low gasifier. This forces the hearth diameter to be on the slender side, but gave some new insights on heat exchange and an offset hopper. Gasifier frame is bolted to the chassis.

Chris Saenz
Chris Saenz's picture
Looking good! Will you be

Looking good! Will you be running Keith style preheat on this unit?

Mike LaRosa
Mike LaRosa's picture
Hi DJ, Leave it to you to be

Hi DJ, Leave it to you to be the usual showman. It's looking great. On my end, I can't decide if my truck is more rotten than the gasifers or the other way around. Very frustrating working on this stuff in the salt belt. I'm busier than a one armed paper hanger right now with my land surveying business but I did get my truck out for a drive the other day. I think it is ready for our gathering in Indiana. It is about a 300 mile trip each way. I figure to do about 150 of them on wood. I sure don't want to hold up any traffic on the 4 lanes like I did on my way back from Wayne's a couple of years ago ... I'm fighting off Lyme Disease again. That's a barrel of laughs, not ... Stay well, Mike LaRosa

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Hello Mike,

Hello Mike,

My truck is actually very good. Few pinholes. It needs a repaint, but that is about all. It is now 5 years in the Netherlands. Guess it came from the South-west, since the dashboard is cracked. Vin number says it is build in Fremont California.

Chris,

I have preheat, but not as excessive as Wayne has. I only exchange heat with ready gas. Primairy air enters the generator by the bottom, bumping into the hottest part of the generator. This is beneficial for both the primairy air and the ready gas, because the equilibrium is frozen.
I skipped the heat exchange aroud the reduction zone, like the Volvo has and like Wayne does. I think it is not a good idea to take heat from there, even when it is put back into the oxidation zone. My principle is: only use waste heat, insulate to the outside to keep this heat as long as possible inside, but also insulate the high level heat of oxidation and reduction zone. You see, 1300 degrees C in the oxidation zone and 500 degrees C of surrounding ready gas is still an 800 degree jump....

So much attention is put into hearth insulation and avoiding heat sinks. Middle section is Imbert/Mukunda style fuel preheat. Lower section and middle section get 25 mm Superwool insulation. The square top is the hopper/monorator and is of course exposed to ambient temperatures.

Regards,
DJ

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Hi DJ

Hi DJ
I find myself thinking in songs more and more recently. Your second bed cut picture 'minds me of the rock song lyric, "The first cut is the deepest". Make's you clench up doing the first cut on somthing rare, valued and still intact does it not? Then . . . once done; it truely is the old English saying of "In for a penny, in for a pound!" Then committed and "No going back now" it becomes easy to enlarge and expand in an efficient workmanship manner. I see this too in your second picture. Tree felling, animal butchering I feel the same way. Not that we don't, or can't do these. Just means we still retain something important not to lose.

Regards
SteveU.

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Steve,

Steve,

That's excact the way it went! First cut very lean. Hmm, tight fit. Bit wider; still tight. What the heck, floor plate has no strength anyway, cut wide enough and bolt the remaining wobbly floor to the gasifier frame!

Regards,
DJ

Martin Payne
Martin Payne's picture
Avoiding firetube meltdown?

Avoiding firetube meltdown?
DJ:
Over the last year, and before Wayne "opened up" his hearth, I have been designing a similar unit. I arrived at a similar conclusion to yours, namely that one shouldn't preheat air by taking heat off the reduction area of the firetube, and in fact, you shouldn't use the heat off the wall of the combustion (nozzle) area of the firetube, either. Then, knowing this probably wasn't lost on Wayne, I asked him about it. He answered that he had tried an insulated firetube, and had melted it down!

I know you build with stainless, which will help some, but even still, how do you avoid overheating the firetube?

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Hello Martin,

Hello Martin,

The firetube itself is insulated by inert char and ash. The oxidation cone is made by this natural insulation, just like a V-hearth. In the reduction zone temperatures are a lot lower, so a stainless steel cone or cilinder will survive.

Long message short: insulate the firetube on the inside.

Regards,
DJ

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Right, we got a flare:

Right, we got a flare.

Everything looks good and feels good. When the outcoming gas reaches the 350 degree F mark, both flare size and the thundering roar from the gasifier become frightening. Not bad for a small hand held vacuumcleaner in push mode as a blower. Every gasifier growls more or less when it reaches working temperatures, but this one makes you feel it.

Next weeks the filterbox/aftercooler combination is to be build.

Regards,
DJ

Terry Lavictoire
Terry Lavictoire's picture
Hi DJ,

Hi DJ,
Beautiful work as per usual!
Those are the coolest looking Cyclones I have ever seen.
TerryL

Tom Vanstone
Beautiful work is right. Very

Beautiful work is right. Very tidy indeed, thankyou for sharing it.

Terry Grzyb
Terry Grzyb's picture
Wow DJ, It looks like it

Wow DJ, It looks like it belongs in the space program!

Wayne Keith
Wayne Keith's picture
Hello DJ,

Hello DJ,

WOW!!!

All I can say is if I was out showing one of my wood burners and you pulled up beside me I would go hide.

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Thanks all for the kind words

Thanks all for the kind words. Hey Mr. Wayne, it being so shiny does not mean it works better than your system... Besides that, after this intense and time consuming project, I am ready again to play with junk materials.

Regards,
DJ

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Right,

Right,

Maiden trip was yesterday. As usual with prototypes, building is only 80% of the job. Now starts the hard and deep thinking... Results were mixed. Frequent backfires from the intake manifold told me something was wrong with the mixture. The vacuumcontroller is probably too small and therefore not accurate enough. After removing it and running on manual control, starting and driving was a piece of cake. But we're not at the finish yet:

-Gas is way too hot. Cyclones are golden brown. I have an internal leak at the ashport (white spot in the carbon dusted walls), but difficult to get rid of it. Lowered the grate to maximum. Further is possible, but asks for taking the gasifier apart. Channelling is also a posibility, why the gas is so hot.
-Gas is white smoky. Yet the car runs well on it, but I like it to be pale blue. Together with the high temperature this could mean some tweaking in hearth dimensions is necessary.
-No soot or tar deposits to find behind the throttle. Only dry carbon dust.
-Damn, is it fast, despite an internal leak and no ignition advance. It is low geared, so 3,000 rpm means 70 mph. Didn't drive faster yet because of the danger of overheating, but more is possible. Acceleration is very good. Idling is smooth.
-Startup time is very short, only 2 minutes.
-New grate does very well, no stirring necessary.

Input on the smoky and hot gas are welcome, so far never had any problems with that on previous gasifiers.

Pic of adding the filter/cooler assembly:

Chris Saenz
Chris Saenz's picture
Hi DJ, Perhaps more heat

Hi DJ, Perhaps more heat recovery on the gas leaving the unit? Not sure what you have currently in that department.

Arvid Olson
Arvid Olson's picture
absolutely beautiful build...

absolutely beautiful build... dang

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Hi DJ

Hi DJ
I was going to ask about your fuel used; then your picture showed me well.

"I think" your cooling assembly is far too inadequate for the amount of heat you need to shed off for this size of system.
Even after you correct your internal hearth problems "I think" this will prove true. SS is less thermal transfer capable than standard carbon steels by a strong %; 21% less I recall. You will need something 3-4X the size you had on the Volvo.
You could verify this by external water spray and forced fan air cooling your existing cooler to confirm this.

Hey, nice roof line on the house/shop. Dual seasonal capable.

Regards
Steve Unruh

Wayne Keith
Wayne Keith's picture
Hello DJ,

Hello DJ,

Nice looking vehicle!!

When I build a new gasifier I save about ten gallon of ash and char from one of the other trucks to pour in the gasifier before start up. Vibrate some of it down through the grate to coat and insulate the ash dump. With this procedure the gasifier will usually burn clean within a few minutes.

On my latest truck I wanted to show how to get it primed with out using the ash form another vehicle.
I bought a bag of charcoal (natural) and put in the gasifier. It wasn’t enough and only brought the level near the nozzles and was very coarse. I also added wood on top.
I had to cycle the gasifier several times before the gas was ready for the motor. I would fire the gasiifer up and get it hot and wait a few hours or the next day and repeat. It took about ten cycles to get the gasifier burnt in properly and eliminate the white smoke and burn clean.
My latest truck seems to run cool, the highest I have seen the temperatures coming from the gasifier into the cooler is 350 F and I was pushing the truck at speeds that was dangerous and illegal. Cruising at about 60 mph it holds about 250-300 F.

My trucks are geared quit high. On the Dakotas 2000 rpm = 65 mph. On the ram 2000 rpm = 75 mph

Nice work and please keep us posted.

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Hello Mr. Wayne,

Hello Mr. Wayne,

I recognize the bbq charcoal problems. Some hard clumps do stay a long time in the reduction zone before they disappear. Had that before. I'll dig the gasifier empty to have a close look.

Steve,

Cooling should be sufficient when the gas leaving the gasifier would be like or lower that the Volvo. Total cooling surface is about 3 times the Volvo. And yes, wood is not the only energy source here. Negative electric bill with 4.8 kWp PV and 800 Watt home made windturbine. Next winter we will also be cooking on wood. Next year full home heating on wood. 10 gallons of gasoline a year for the chainsaw will be all Dino fuel we need then....

Hello Chris,

An extra preheat mantle would do no harm. Back to the drawing table...

Regards,
DJ

David Siedschlag
David Siedschlag's picture
Hello DJ,

Hello DJ,
David S. here to formally introduce myself. We have not chated before, but I will chime in with the rest of the group and say nice work. I am also building a stainless unit that I have been working on for a couple of years. Obviously I don't stay at it steady. Its home will be a 4 cyl toyota truck. I like how you kept your unit very compact on this truck. I was however looking at pictures over on your site of the volvo build, and had a couple of questions if you don't mind?
I will not be able to keep my unit as compact as you did do to the box being very close to the frame, and a gas tank being in the way on the other side. I could just remove the gas tank as that is the obective right? Anyway, what size motor does your volvo have, and how did it perform with what I will call all the wind catching stuff on hanging on the back namely the gasifier?
I will end up above the cab a fair amount with my hopper due to my mini pickup being low profile, and am concerned of wind drag, although we are dealing with cylinders here and they are somewhat aerodynamic.
Again nice work on your stuff. I really appreciate that you are sharing with all of us what your up to.
Thanks
David S.

Mike LaRosa
Mike LaRosa's picture
DJ, It is strange how putting

DJ, It is strange how putting recovered heat into the primary air cools the exiting gas .. Hope you find the air leak that may be wasting your gas ... Mike L

Mike LaRosa
Mike LaRosa's picture
DJ, Oh, Could you send me

DJ, Oh, Could you send me your cyclones ??? Thanks, Mike

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
David,

David,

Excuse me for the delayed reply. Not sure where your gas tank is, so I cannot answer that question. I like Waynes approach to stay above of the frame. It is less complicated and does not compromise the design. Drawback is either a small fuel bin or a high gasifier.
The Volvo has a 2.3 liter engine. It is low torque and even lower by using a camshaft of a turbo engine. It has less overlap of the cams. A Volvo 240 is nicknamed "brick", so it catches wind anyway.... The gasifier will add to the drag, but it's weight seems to me more of a problem, certainly when you are surrounded by hills.

Steve,

You are right on the cooling. I took care of the internal leaks and modified the air preheat. Gas temperature is lower now. Dew point will be somewhere between end of the precooler and early stage of the filter. The cooler not being in direct wind does not help much either.

I also took care of a new, bigger vacuum controller and placed it so that it is not affected by braking or bumping. Works well. Driving without controller askes for frequent manual adjustments and a soft right foot.

I added gas reheating in order to keep the mixer and intake manifold dry. It is a simple tube in tube heat exchanger. Some of the exhaust gas of the left hand exhaust pipe is bypassed to the reheater.

Now I'm testdriving, tweaking and making small changes. Wet filter does what I expected: the condensate after the filter is clear. Which does not mean the gas is ultimately clean. Dry carbon dust can be found after the throttle/mixing valves. This powder can only be prevented by dry filtering. But that is a choice between ultimate filtration by sensitive materials or less filtering by means of fool proof material. The gas is absolutely tar free. Not even an oily tang on the filter/cooler condensate. No smelly black fingers this time.

Fuel consumption seems about double of the Volvo, which makes sense, because on dino it also uses the double amount. On the Volvo I can go as low as .65 pounds to the mile on long distances and 1 pound on short tracks and city traffic.

Pics will follow soon. I am repainting the car for now. The sound of the car is wonderful. On LPG or gas the Cherry Bomb mufflers sound harsh, but on woodgas the noise is softened, but still dark. It even pleases females.....

Regards,
DJ

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Took the beast to the

Took the beast to the motorway today for a performance test. The vacuum controller gave some trouble, because it choked the air too much. Apparently the membrane is stretched and giving a floppy control, same as the previous smaller one, which worked well on the Volvo. So I drove without choke, not even a manual choke, but with a very tender right foot.

Performance is good enough: 82 mph. 0-60 in 32 seconds. 0-30 takes more time than 30-60. For me an indication some gain can be found in adequate mixture control at low rpms. 82 mph corresponds to about 3,500 rpm. And I still haven't ignition advance...

Regards,
DJ

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Hi DJ

Hi DJ
Nice paint job. Color helps blend in the gasifier.
Your gearing just like your answer about hopper capacity is a choice. You still want this to be a pulling farm truck also, eh?

Once your paint has all summer to hardened up good I would still suggest 100-150 mm pieces of acrylic wool yarn removable painters taped all over so you can actually see the air flows and turbulence zones. Amazing the difference just dropping down the bed tail gate can make.
May be an air flow shaping deflector wing at the trailing edge of the cab like on the front of older European RR locomotives could smooth out and increase your cooler tubes air flows.

Regards
Steve Unruh

Gary Graham
Gary Graham's picture
Hi DJ,

Hi DJ,
I am curious about the total weight..and the gear ratio. Looks really amazing !!

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Gary,

Gary,

I don't know the gear ratio, I just compared speed to rpm. Took a temporary rpm clock from an other car. The speedometer is correct, if the radar speed checkers along the road are correct too. Weight of the gasifier system is about 350 kg.

Steve,

Already read somewhere that a dropped tail gate reduces fuel consumption. I might add a kind of wind catcher for better cooling. But only if the gained efficiency wins from extra drag. On the other hand, if performance, handling and gas quality is good, why try to make this an fuel efficient car. It wasn't from the beginning, 40 years ago...

Still, it amazes me that this relatively large engine can run 3,500 rpm on full power, without ignition advance. Myth busted? I doubt it. Need to work on ignition advance.

Regards,
DJ

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Hey DJ

Hey DJ
I like the way your planned through the back window gauge viewing gap in your system has turned out.
I am sure your second primary drive will like on this one, the ability to see directly behind for backing up.
And you for the trailing speed police.
You are already bumping into Vesa's speed/time performance numbers he has published for forced induction super and turbocharged woodgas fueled small block V-8's.

Ignition timing: you should already have a total of ~44 degrees BTDC above 2500-3000 engine RPM on an this at least 8.5 to 1 compression engine. Surly better than the 10-15 degrees fixed you only have on most small engines ( many valve in block below 8 to 1 compression) - part of the source of the myth I am sure.
One of the India Institute of Science papers Chris Seanz put in the PDF resources here states that Good composite woodgas has a ~30% faster burning speed in comparison to methane/propane. Their in Lab works then compared to out in the field deployed systems in the last 25 years has collapsed many of the carry over woodgas myths.
Primary to some of these myths I believe is taking 1930's thru 1960's slower speed flame front charcoal and coke gasifing (high CO, low H2, NO CH4) experience in low compression long stroke engines and applying it to faster flame front good below 50% N2 composite 15-20% CO AND H2, and always 1-4% CH4 raw woodfuel gas out of the more modern developed systems in then higher compression short stroke engines.

Easiest quick way to tell on your current system set-up would be to hand pump suck on the distributor vacuum advance at your 3500 rpm under a load. Should be good for another 8-10 degrees of crank shaft advance.

Regards
Steve Unruh

David Siedschlag
David Siedschlag's picture
DJ

DJ
Could you elaborate a little more on how you do the bushings and rods and attach the valve flaps to the rods. Also you said you use copper water pipe for your bushings. Are you making these a press fit somehow into the steel tube. Details like those would be appreciated.
David S

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Well David, the assembly is

Well David, the assembly is done with oridinary DIY tools. I do not have a lathe, but it would improve the quality of the work.
The 12x1 mm waterpipe already fits tight over the 10 mm rods. Drill two 12 mm holes in the throttle tube, stick the copper waterpipe pieces in and align them with a 10 mm rod. Braze the copper pipes to the throttle tube. One end gets an end cap brazed over the tube. You can add a grease nipple to the end cap. Where the flaps are fixed to the rods, you file a flat spot on the rods, just like a conventional carburettor throttle valve. Drill the two holes in the flap (for connection to the rod) a bit wider. Tighten the screws while pressing/aligning the flap to the throttle tube inner wall. Lock the screws! You do not want one of them eaten by the motor.

Regards,
DJ

David Siedschlag
David Siedschlag's picture
Thank you kindly DJ. I guess

Thank you kindly DJ. I guess I never though of just fileing a flat spot on the shaft. I kept thinking I had to put a slit perfectly in the middle to slide the plate through and then drill and screw it. I got one done today. I made a stainless 14ga disc with a 2.5 inch hole saw. It fit nice inside of my 2.5 inch stainless tube I am using. I filed the flat spot on a brass 1/4 inch rod, drilled my holes in the disc and shaft, and drilled 1/4 inch holes direct accross from each other in the tube and bingo! I think I will get some or make some small 1/4 inch SS bushings I can tig tack to my tube for guides and I will have it. Then on to a second. Oh and I won't forget the locktight on the screws.
Thanks again for the input!
Grateful from my side of the pond!
David S

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Right, where overhauling on

Right, where overhauling on motorways with the Volvo can be embarrassing sometimes, it can be done by the Chevy pulling a heavy trailer at 70 mph. Just do not do that when your exit is only a minute away. The excess heat will stow the mixture overrich, stalling a low idling engine....
Traffic jam or prolonged idling is no problem. Gasifier keeps its temperature at very comfortable levels. The hearth insulation is paying off.

Still driving without any mixture control, not even any manual choking. Flaps are always fully opened. Just can't find out why this setup seems to do it by itself, just asking for a tender right foot, following the acceleration. Need a way to lean the mixture on long cruising distances. Got the impression the mixture is always on the rich side. Fuel consumption is high too.

On idle after a drive, I see exhaust fumes. Unburned carbon black? Exhaust pipe is black with carbon. Never observed that with the dry filtered Volvo. It also could be caused by the overrich mixture.

The new grate in combination with a high gas speed is a dream. It just doesn't ever ask for scraping, despite a for an Imbert very long reduction zone. The spilled fine char is swept from the generator bottom to the cyclones.

Regards,
DJ

Steve Unruh
Steve Unruh's picture
Good reporting DJ.

Good reporting DJ.
Bleed some extra air in through the Impco with the propane electric gas lock off and the manual valve just cracked open?? Just for testing.

Have you done anything with the ignition timing yet?

Regards
Steve Unruh

Chris Saenz
Chris Saenz's picture
Hi DJ,

Hi DJ,

You just made Featured Project of the Month on the front page. Congratulations! Can you give us an update on the truck?

Peter Coronis
Peter Coronis's picture
Hi DJ

Hi DJ

Absolutely a beautiful piece of work. Your attention to detail is superb!! Sure wish we could see it in person.

Peter C

Wayne Keith
Wayne Keith's picture
Hey Peter ,

Hey Peter ,

After seeing DJs I want to park mine behind the barn!

Peter Coronis
Peter Coronis's picture
Hey Wayne,

Hey Wayne,

I disagree with that statement, Your's will be the one doing laps around the barn!!!

Peter

Dutch John
Dutch John's picture
Thanks Chris and Wayne, much

Thanks Chris and Wayne, much appreciated!

Steve, a manual ignition control is on the wish list for this week.

Checked the wet filter today. The hay seems to filter fine, the shavings not, they pack and channel. The oily household fiber filters well, but is not self cleaning. To bad, since the carbon dust sticks easier to oil than to water. On high outside temperatures the precooler lacks capacity. The lower part of the filter is a dry filter then.....
The mixture control still puzzles me. I first have to drill several vacuum measuring points in the mixer tubes to find out what is wrong. Or perhaps it could turn out to be something very good. I mean, 80+ mph without choking air....
Didn't touch the scraper for 300 miles now and still no increasing pressure drop over the hearth. Eeri.
So a mix of very good, good and less good experiences. Stepped over a few borders again, which is always good. Take that experience to the next systems. We have a saying that one needs to build a house three times to be satisfied. To be completely satisfied about a gasifier will take 6, 7, perhaps even more.

Regards,
DJ

Gary Graham
Gary Graham's picture
Hi DJ,

Hi DJ,
Nice work on the twin cyclones ! The SS work is really a showpiece and the photos show your work really nicely. Would like to hear the growl one day !

How did you size the twin cyclones, just use half the CFM of the engine for each ?

Peter Coronis
Peter Coronis's picture
Hi DJ,

Hi DJ,

I am still a beginner at WG, but i can shed some light on performance gains to early GM pick ups. The rear end in your truck is a 14 bolt Corporate. The factory ratios available were 321, 342, 370, 410,456. The housing is identical to a 1 ton duallie housing except for outer hubs & backing plate anchor location. This rear end, although extremely durable, combined with 16in wheels & tires is overkill, very heavy & extremely energy inefficient. The frame rails are the same as a 1/2 ton. A complete 1/2 ton front end is a bolt in to your chassis. !/2 ton rear end is also a bolt in with 3/4 or 1/2 t springs. Your complete cab w/ nose, radiator support, radiator, hood & bumper weighs approximately 1200lbs.

Years ago, a very common conversion was the installation of a big block into a 1/2t pick up. The performance level between a 1/2t & 3/4t was night & day. I know you are not building a hot rod, just food for thought.

Peter

Tom Vanstone
Looking great

Looking great
Can't wait to see this thing!

Michael Davis
Michael Davis's picture
Top Notch! I want to build

Top Notch! I want to build one now. Very inspirational work.

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